Month: February 2016

Monday Mini Virtual Vacation

Living in Coastal North Carolina has its advantages: mild winters with an occasional cold snap, fresh seafood and sandy beaches. If you’re like me, no matter how mild, winter has worn out its welcome and a warm weather vacation can’t get here soon enough. While I can’t do anything about the temperature, I thought I’d share a little virtual sun and surf with you.  Enjoy!

 

The Maltese Falcon 75th Anniversary

75th AnniversaryShowing of theMaltese FalconHumphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet – I just love those guys!  So when I realized that The Maltese Falcon was being shown on the big screen, I knew I had to go. Because seriously – How do you pass up the chance to see some of the most memorable movie characters brought to life – Sam Spade (Bogart), Joel Cairo (Lorre) & Kasper Gutman (Greenstreet).  I was in black and white movie geek heaven!

What I think  is so compelling about the Maltese Falcon is this movie is character driven. The plot it there – but it’s the characters and in particular – the incredible chemistry between these three actors that capture my attention.

Seeing the movie on the big screen offered a unique perspective.  I noticed moments of humor that I had missed in the past and found a new appreciation for the cinematography.

And then there’s Sydney Greenstreet.  The Maltese Falcon is Greenstreet’s first time on film and he’s a natural.  The way he moves says as much as any words he might use.  He’s my favorite actor to watch when doing character studies.

Quote from one of my favorite scenes between Kasper Gutman (Greenstreet) and Sam Spade (Bogart).

I distrust a man who says “when.” If he’s got to be careful not to drink too much, it’s because he’s not to be trusted when he does.
~ Kasper Gutman, The Maltese Falcon (1941).

Now, if I can find a showing of Conflict (Bogart and Greenstreet, 1945)…

BOOK SIGNINGS, PAPERBACKS, AND YOUR LOCAL MARKET

Carol Ann Ross, C. Evenfall, & MeOur group selfie - Book Signing 02-13-16On Saturday,  I joined authors Carol Ann Ross and C. Evenfall for a book signing event at The Mermaid’s Purse in Surf City, N.C.  The weather was a little nippy. Okay, I’m lying.  It was downright cold & the winds coming off the Atlantic were brutal.  Good thing our table was inside!

Beach towns have a tendency to become ghost towns  in the winter and considering the weather, we were afraid no one would venture out.  Lucky for us, there were a few brave souls. I think we all had a wonderful time.

In the digital age, don’t discount the paperback:

There’s an old saying that goes something like this – He’s a big fish in a little pond.  In the ocean that is Amazon, I figure I’m something akin to plankton. When it comes to my local pond, I’m certainly not the biggest fish, but I’m not snail sludge either.

My books: I chose to publish e-Books as well as paperbacks.  (And I’m thinking about trying an audio with the next one.)  On Amazon, the e-Books sell, the paperbacks -not so much.  The profit margin on the e-Books is pretty slim.  I’ll have to sell a lot of them to quit my day job.

This is why I like paperbacks:

It’s hard to participate in a book signing event if I don’t have a physical copy of my book. Let’s face it – nobody wants me signing their Kindle.

I live in a vacation area.  Visitors like buying books by local authors.  Having said that – locals like supporting locals, too.  Not only do I have books in local shops, I’ve found participating in community events like craft shows and Holiday festivals are a great way to not only get my name out there, but to sell books.  The truth of the matter is this:  When we’re talking money – my local sales out perform my internet sales.  Maybe one day that won’t be the case but for now, it is what it is.

Looking at my KDP report isn’t exactly exhilarating, but selling several books at a local festival – that rocks! And getting a monthly check for the books sold at a local store isn’t too bad, either.

My advice:

If you’re not finding the success you’d hoped for on Amazon, etc.,  don’t overlook the value of your local market.